The News From Dysart - Second Week of January 1914

Top Stories

A New Vaccine Appears to be Working!

"Vaccination for typhoid fever has been demonstrated successful in both the army and navy of the United States. In the whole army, with 50,000 men, there are only two cases of typhoid fever during the past year. One of these cases is a man not immunized and the other was vaccinated, but it is thought that his vaccination was for some reason or other not effective. In the army, vaccination against typhoid is compulsory. In the navy there were seven cases of typhoid fever during the entire year, but vaccination in the navy was not made compulsory as early as in the army. It is now compulsory. The vaccination for typhoid seems to have removed one more dread of army and navy life. Armies especially have been devastated by this disease. If this vaccination had been known before the Spanish-American War, it would have saved many lives. Vaccination for typhoid has exceeded all records for vaccination against smallpox. The time is coming when other diseases will be obliterated by vaccination. The world is coming to the idea of disease prevention. The success that has been achieved and demonstrated in typhoid fever will make such progress more rapid and certain. "

Local News

Family Fights Back Against Implication of Theft

The Traer Star Clipper reported this week that "Will Aschenbrenner of Dysart was in Traer this week consulting with attorneys relative to a peculiar happening in his town. The other night $25 worth of feathers were stolen from the produce dealer, H.W. Beilke. Bloodhounds from Waterloo were employed and put upon the scent, some of the businessmen aiding in the cost. The hounds followed the railroad track most of the time two miles east, then went a mile north and west, returning to town from the north and passing through town, bringing up at Will Ashenbrenner's residence, and refused to go further. The house was searched, and no feathers were found and there the matter stands. Mrs. Aschenbrenner had been working in the produce store a week before. Mr. A feels much wrought up and was inclined to prosecute but the attorneys did not take the case. Of course, the public opinion is divided but we understand the Aschenbrenners are generally thought to be innocent, despite the verdict of the blood hounds. Later developments may shed more light."

Farm Report

The Des Moines Homestead paper reports that R. W. Waller sold a cow named Lassie, born in 1910 for $140.00.

The Zoebel Bros are offering for sale an April yearling white Short-horn bull sired by Rosie's Prince by Scottish Prince and out of Imp. Rosie. The bull they are offering is out of Butterfly's Golden 2d, a Cruickshank Butterfly cow, sired by Golden Lad, he by the noted show bull, The Lad for Me. This bull is of the right type and in excellent breeding condition, and any breeder in need of a good white Shorthorn bull should visit this firm and look over this animal. They also have three ten-month bulls sired by King Archer...Zoebel's also have a few good Percheron stallions and mares for sale.

 

Business News

Stores to Close at Seven O'Clock

"Finally, the Dysart merchants have decided to close their stores at seven o'clock in the evening instead of staying open till everybody had their visit out. Most of the towns throughout the country have been doing this for some time. Dysart has started the habit several times but never held to it but for a few months at a time. There is nothing to the old reason of waiting for the farmers. Farmers are not coming to town at nine and ten o'clock in the evenings nowadays as they used to years ago. Times have changed and the old habit of the stores staying open fifteen and sixteen hours a day should change accordingly. When the closing time is seven o'clock there is a little more pleasure to the clerk's life."

"We the undersigned proprietors of Dysart stores, will close our respective places of business from Monday, January 5 to April 1st, at 7 o'clock in the evening except Saturday."

Keidel Brothers
Henry Pippert
J.M Tupper
J.H. Lindeman
R. Cold and Son

Isaac Dicken Buys Dray Line

This is an unknown Dray Line Driver and Rig inserted in the story to help the reader understand the term. It is not a Dysart resident to the best of the Editor's knowledge.

"Isaac Dicken purchased John Ackerman's dray line. The deal includes horses, wagons and street sprinkler. Possession to be given on January 15. Mr. Dicken has been running Will Rueppel's dray business for the past several years and proven himself a very accommodating drayman. Ackerman has operated the third draw line for Dysart for several years and has worked up a good business. The Dysart draymen have always been busy. Now that Mr. Ackerman has sold his dray, he will focus on his butcher and egg business. However, he is thinking seriously of moving to California. He is offering his property south of Dysart for sale and if he finds a buyer, the town will lose the Ackerman family. "

This image is from the Cobblestone Museum in Albion, New York and is entered as an example of what a harness shop might have looked like in 1914. This is not Mr. Schmidt's shop in Dysart.

"One of the oldest businessmen in Dysart, one that has been in the same business in the same building for thirty years, is C.J. Schmidt. He started in business in the building he now occupies thirty years ago this spring, when Dysart was just a promising young town and probably before the boom tide had left. When Mr. Schmidt first came here the beginning of the town was still fresh in the people's minds and he can tell the history of Dysart from the beginning down to the present day. Last week, C.J. Schmidt sold a half interest in his business to his son, Ed Schmidt. Ed was brought up in the harness business and is a practical harness maker, having worked for his father for the past 7 or 8 years. The business will no doubt be strengthened by the partnership."

Editor's Note: A biography of C. J. Schmidt which originally appeared in the History of Tama County has been placed on the Tidbit's page.

Ben Pippert has also sold his dray business. He has sold to John Sorrell. Ben has rented the Fuoss farm west of Dysart where he will move March 1.

School News

Social News

Last week we learned that Dr. Forward was considering a move to Dysart for his Naprapathic  practice and this week it is announced that he has indeed made the move.

1914 Oakland Automobile

Fred Bower has a new Oakland auto, Emil Barta a Ford, and Albert Ames a second hand Ford.

A ten-dollar reward is being offered for the return of a Violin outfit lost Friday, January 2, 1914, between Creps' livery barn at Dysart and Elberon, on the first road west of Dysart. The outfit consisted of a fine violin, a snakewood bow, black leather case, and a few violin supplies. Finder, please call Elberon Orchestra and receive your reward. E. J. Kucera.

 

Editor's Note: At a later date, I am hoping to write more about the fraternal organizations which were popular in early 1900 society in Dysart. To clarify for today's reader the First National Bank is not the brick building which currently stands at the corner of Main and Wilson. That building did not open until 1917. According to "Stepping Stones in Time" the First National Bank was located on the east side of Main Street. It as three stories tall and made of brick. The bank occupied the first floor, the second floor was rented to medical Doctors and Dentists, while the third floor was used as a lodge hall. The Editor believes this building was still standing in the 1960s but defers to more knowledgeable readers.

 

Entertainment

Area Churches

The Luther League will meet at the home of Ervin Moeller on Friday evening, Jan. 6th, instead of Tuesday, Jan. 13th. A German play, "Many Cooks Spoil the Broth" will be the main entertainment of the evening and all members are requested to be present and witness the program. Annual dues should be paid at that time.

Editor's Note: The January 8, 1914, edition of the Dysart Reporter contained an ad for the Church of Christ which I have opted to exclude from my post. The ad is decidedly anti-Catholic and doesn't bear repeating. According to "Stepping Stones in Time" the church was established in May of 1913 by two evangelists and met in a home and a hall before a church building was erected north of the railroad tracks. This building opened in December of 1913. The church was discontinued in 1918 due to a lack of membership. The building was moved and became a residence which sat at the end of my small neighborhood. I remember playing in that house as a child. Looking back on it now, I can see how it could of at one time been a church.

 

Advertising

Mr. R.C. McElhiney has placed ads in several local papers trying to sell his Rambler 5 passenger automobile. States he will sell it cheap or trade for horses.

Abe Lincoln has placed an ad looking for two of his two-year-old steers who have strayed from the farm. Each weigh about 700 pounds. He asks that "anyone knowing anything about these animals kindly notify him."

Posted in Iowa Stories.

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